STAGESTRUCK

A Bridal Editorial Featuring the Charlotte Ballet and SlamCharlotte with Imagery by Christi Falls, Richard Israel, Amy Kolodziej, and Timm Young

Preface: After quickly discovering that our original long-form house style would simply not do these breathtaking media components justice, we sourced our leading web development from the forward-thinking cities of London, New York City, Brisbane, and Sydney – on three different continents with respective time zone considerations, no less.

In presenting this editorial feature, Charlotte Brides is now honored to become the first media outlet and/or publication in the entire Charlotte metro area to utilize these advanced techniques, our end credits proudly featuring the same innovators from the likes of BBC and Time Inc. We expressly thank Rachael Amesbury and Rachel Bartlett of Shorthand for their generosity of time and resources in the creation of this piece.

The final result? An interactive and cinematic storytelling experience integrated across multiple digital devices with two beautiful scripts running simultaneously – for your viewing pleasure. That said, we are among the very first to use this beta code with our given platform, so please kindly contact the editor with any concerns, comments, or feedback here.*

*Please do note that while every effort has been made to ensure mobile responsivity, the story is best viewed using recently updated devices and favors Wi-Fi. Outdated or obscure technology and/or lesser connectivity may affect functionality.

NOTE: At a time when the arts are being actively defunded and devalued on a national level, we seek to bring awareness and raise funds through an inter-disciplinary editorial shoot with our local live events and wedding industry. Your unique click in the first full 72 hours of this post will generate a $0.25 donation as made by Charlotte Brides to both the Arts & Science Council and to the Charlotte Ballet with our pledges of $1250.

Featuring five world-class company dancers from the Charlotte Ballet alongside a duo of aspiring members from its youth program, two revered poets from SlamCharlotte, and one lauded violinist, this editorial boasts an eclectic representation of the Queen City’s most celebrated performing artists and cultural offerings. Four award-winning visual media artists – by way of photography and cinematography – have captured every detail, proudly presenting their distinct styles.

History meets modernity as the resulting imagery and videography harmoniously blend classical ballet disciplines, retro Super 8mm filmography, advanced digital photography, innovative bridal fashion, southern slam poetry, contemporary floral design, and centurial neoclassical architecture.

The Piedmont Renaissance Center of Concord, in serving as the ideal backdrop for a convergence of traditional and modern, will soon jubilate in its centennial.

As designed by famed architects of old, William Lee Stoddard and Christopher Gadsden Sayre, it boasts a sure checklist of hallmark Beaux Arts Classical Revival elements – from the center’s impactful limestone façade to its grandiose sextuplet of marble columns.

The palatial lobby, once serving as a central bank for the region’s bustling textile industry, now functions as an offbeat wedding and events space. To this day, its gleaming historic vault, complete with original copper cogs and steel inner-workings, remains proudly on display.

Flight after flight of narrow and winding Carrara marble clad stairs reveal upper building levels that were originally constructed as guestrooms for the long-defunct Concord Hotel.

The Piedmont Renaissance Center of Concord, in serving as the ideal backdrop for a convergence of traditional and modern, will soon jubilate in its centennial.

As designed by famed architects of old, William Lee Stoddard and Christopher Gadsden Sayre, it boasts a sure checklist of hallmark Beaux Arts Classical Revival elements – from the center’s impactful limestone façade to its grandiose sextuplet of marble columns.

The palatial lobby, once serving as a central bank for the region’s bustling textile industry, now functions as an offbeat wedding and events space. To this day, its gleaming historic vault, complete with original copper cogs and steel inner-workings, remains proudly on display.

Flight after flight of narrow and winding Carrara marble clad stairs reveal upper building levels that were originally constructed as guestrooms for the long-defunct Concord Hotel.

For decades, the stories have remained abandoned and undisturbed. However, the seemingly forlorn floors will soon be transformed into a multimillion-dollar live-work revitalization, the efforts of which will create over a dozen luxury lofts and petite storefronts.

...And so, this editorial takes full advantage of tens of thousands of square feet of decaying floors – having been essentially left to ruins – the likes of which are not long for this world.

The seemingly endless walls of chipping paint and the exposed, rusted-out pipes along with the austere concrete floor all combine to cast the eeriest of auras. But the ever-romantic interplay of these melancholic, abandoned stories with the dancers’ dreamy tulles and gossamer silks proves itself nothing short of magical.

For decades, the stories have remained abandoned and undisturbed. However, the seemingly forlorn floors will soon be transformed into a multimillion-dollar live-work revitalization, the efforts of which will create over a dozen luxury lofts and petite storefronts.

...And so, this editorial takes full advantage of tens of thousands of square feet of decaying floors – having been essentially left to ruins – the likes of which are not long for this world.

The seemingly endless walls of chipping paint and the exposed, rusted-out pipes along with the austere concrete floor all combine to cast the eeriest of auras. But the ever-romantic interplay of these melancholic, abandoned stories with the dancers’ dreamy tulles and gossamer silks proves itself nothing short of magical.

Once again, Amy Kolodziej of Sunshower Photography proves herself a master photodocumentarian. Kolodziej’s work presents an inexplicable iconic quality.

While Kolodziej finds herself at home in the lucent, sundrenched upper floors, she just as easily dominates the stark studio backlighting, seizing every shot. The result? Vivid, impactful, and transcendental imagery.

This is Scrollmation. As you scroll through this example text you’ll notice the images are controlled by your scrolling.

Scrollmation can be used in various creative ways to add another dimension to your story. The rest of this text is simply a placeholder, so feel free to get started and create your own Scrollmation.

Traditional animation (also called cel animation or hand-drawn animation) was the process used for most animated films of the 20th century. The individual frames of a traditionally animated film are photographs of drawings that are first drawn on paper. To create the illusion of movement, each drawing differs slightly from the one before it. The animators' drawings are traced or photocopied onto transparent acetate sheets called cels, which are filled in with paints in assigned colors or tones on the side opposite the line drawings. The completed character cels are photographed one-by-one against a painted background by a rostrum camera onto motion picture film . The traditional cel animation process became obsolete by the beginning of the 21st century. Today, animators' drawings and the backgrounds are either scanned into or drawn directly into a computer system.

Various software programs are used to color the drawings and simulate camera movement and effects.

The final animated piece is output to one of several delivery media, including traditional 35 mm film and newer media such as digital video. The "look" of traditional cel animation is still preserved, and the character animators' work has remained essentially the same over the past 70 years. Some animation producers have used the term "tradigital" to describe cel animation which makes extensive use of computer technology. Examples of traditionally animated feature films include Pinocchio (United States, 1940), Animal Farm (United Kingdom, 1954), and Akira (Japan, 1988). Traditional animated films which were produced with the aid of computer technology include The Lion King (US, 1994) Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi (Spirited Away) (Japan, 2001), and Les Triplettes de Belleville (France, 2003).

In computer displays, filmmaking, television production, and other kinetic displays, scrolling is sliding text, images or video across a monitor or display, vertically or horizontally. "Scrolling", as such, does not change the layout of the text or pictures, but moves (pans or tilts) the user's view across what is apparently a larger image that is not wholly seen. A common television and movie special effect is to scroll credits, while leaving the background stationary. Scrolling may take place completely without user intervention (as in film credits) or, on an interactive device, be triggered by touchscreen or computer mouse motion or a keypress and continue without further intervention until a further user action, or be entirely controlled by input devices. Scrolling may take place in discrete increments (perhaps one or a few lines of text at a time), or continuously (smooth scrolling). Frame rate is the speed at which an entire image is redisplayed. It is related to scrolling in that changes to text and image position can only happen as often as the image can be redisplayed. When frame rate is a limiting factor, one smooth scrolling technique is to blur images during movement that would otherwise appear to "jump". The term scrolling is also used for a type of misbehavior in an online chat room whereby one person forces the screens of others in a chat to scroll by inserting much noise or special control characters.

Words from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animation and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrolling.

What does this wistfully romantic space, a world in and of itself, look like through Timm Young’s lens?

Frame by frame – and with thousands of carefully selected frames – an entire repertory of emotive vignettes is articulated in just two minutes of footage, each moment synced to the symphony's accompaniment.

TIMM YOUNG FILMS, “Grand Jeté”

This is Scrollmation. As you scroll through this example text you’ll notice the images are controlled by your scrolling.

Scrollmation can be used in various creative ways to add another dimension to your story. The rest of this text is simply a placeholder, so feel free to get started and create your own Scrollmation.

Traditional animation (also called cel animation or hand-drawn animation) was the process used for most animated films of the 20th century. The individual frames of a traditionally animated film are photographs of drawings that are first drawn on paper. To create the illusion of movement, each drawing differs slightly from the one before it. The animators' drawings are traced or photocopied onto transparent acetate sheets called cels, which are filled in with paints in assigned colors or tones on the side opposite the line drawings. The completed character cels are photographed one-by-one against a painted background by a rostrum camera onto motion picture film . The traditional cel animation process became obsolete by the beginning of the 21st century. Today, animators' drawings and the backgrounds are either scanned into or drawn directly into a computer system.

Various software programs are used to color the drawings and simulate camera movement and effects.

The final animated piece is output to one of several delivery media, including traditional 35 mm film and newer media such as digital video. The "look" of traditional cel animation is still preserved, and the character animators' work has remained essentially the same over the past 70 years. Some animation producers have used the term "tradigital" to describe cel animation which makes extensive use of computer technology. Examples of traditionally animated feature films include Pinocchio (United States, 1940), Animal Farm (United Kingdom, 1954), and Akira (Japan, 1988). Traditional animated films which were produced with the aid of computer technology include The Lion King (US, 1994) Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi (Spirited Away) (Japan, 2001), and Les Triplettes de Belleville (France, 2003).

In computer displays, filmmaking, television production, and other kinetic displays, scrolling is sliding text, images or video across a monitor or display, vertically or horizontally. "Scrolling", as such, does not change the layout of the text or pictures, but moves (pans or tilts) the user's view across what is apparently a larger image that is not wholly seen. A common television and movie special effect is to scroll credits, while leaving the background stationary. Scrolling may take place completely without user intervention (as in film credits) or, on an interactive device, be triggered by touchscreen or computer mouse motion or a keypress and continue without further intervention until a further user action, or be entirely controlled by input devices. Scrolling may take place in discrete increments (perhaps one or a few lines of text at a time), or continuously (smooth scrolling). Frame rate is the speed at which an entire image is redisplayed. It is related to scrolling in that changes to text and image position can only happen as often as the image can be redisplayed. When frame rate is a limiting factor, one smooth scrolling technique is to blur images during movement that would otherwise appear to "jump". The term scrolling is also used for a type of misbehavior in an online chat room whereby one person forces the screens of others in a chat to scroll by inserting much noise or special control characters.

Words from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animation and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrolling.

The striking portrait series by fine art film photographer, Richard Israel, features his characteristic style-of-old with dark, dramatic vignettes enveloping each frame. With ease, Israel tames the bright midday light, pouring through the northeasterly windows and flooding the floor space. The result? A collection of photographs that presents itself both sincere and unaffected.

And each shot somehow proves more intimate, perhaps even divulging fragments of the subjects’ deepest selves.

It is as though Israel embraces this certain hesitancy, a vulnerable moment anteceding each audible shutter. It is in that fraction of a second – in that veracious, most unbiased intermediary and just before she settles into her intended pose – it is then that her soul is bared before his lens, that one of her truths is revealed.

This is Scrollmation. As you scroll through this example text you’ll notice the images are controlled by your scrolling.

Scrollmation can be used in various creative ways to add another dimension to your story. The rest of this text is simply a placeholder, so feel free to get started and create your own Scrollmation.

Traditional animation (also called cel animation or hand-drawn animation) was the process used for most animated films of the 20th century. The individual frames of a traditionally animated film are photographs of drawings that are first drawn on paper. To create the illusion of movement, each drawing differs slightly from the one before it. The animators' drawings are traced or photocopied onto transparent acetate sheets called cels, which are filled in with paints in assigned colors or tones on the side opposite the line drawings. The completed character cels are photographed one-by-one against a painted background by a rostrum camera onto motion picture film . The traditional cel animation process became obsolete by the beginning of the 21st century. Today, animators' drawings and the backgrounds are either scanned into or drawn directly into a computer system.

Various software programs are used to color the drawings and simulate camera movement and effects.

The final animated piece is output to one of several delivery media, including traditional 35 mm film and newer media such as digital video. The "look" of traditional cel animation is still preserved, and the character animators' work has remained essentially the same over the past 70 years. Some animation producers have used the term "tradigital" to describe cel animation which makes extensive use of computer technology. Examples of traditionally animated feature films include Pinocchio (United States, 1940), Animal Farm (United Kingdom, 1954), and Akira (Japan, 1988). Traditional animated films which were produced with the aid of computer technology include The Lion King (US, 1994) Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi (Spirited Away) (Japan, 2001), and Les Triplettes de Belleville (France, 2003).

In computer displays, filmmaking, television production, and other kinetic displays, scrolling is sliding text, images or video across a monitor or display, vertically or horizontally. "Scrolling", as such, does not change the layout of the text or pictures, but moves (pans or tilts) the user's view across what is apparently a larger image that is not wholly seen. A common television and movie special effect is to scroll credits, while leaving the background stationary. Scrolling may take place completely without user intervention (as in film credits) or, on an interactive device, be triggered by touchscreen or computer mouse motion or a keypress and continue without further intervention until a further user action, or be entirely controlled by input devices. Scrolling may take place in discrete increments (perhaps one or a few lines of text at a time), or continuously (smooth scrolling). Frame rate is the speed at which an entire image is redisplayed. It is related to scrolling in that changes to text and image position can only happen as often as the image can be redisplayed. When frame rate is a limiting factor, one smooth scrolling technique is to blur images during movement that would otherwise appear to "jump". The term scrolling is also used for a type of misbehavior in an online chat room whereby one person forces the screens of others in a chat to scroll by inserting much noise or special control characters.

Words from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animation and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrolling.

Dasan Ahanu, revered pillar of the Charlotte community and relentless advocate for the literary arts world, possesses a miles-long list of related accolades, notable appearances, and awards. Ahanu holds prestigious titles in the world of academia, including his role as a visiting professor at UNC Chapel Hill and as the recipient of Harvard’s 2015-2016 Nasir Jones Fellowship. With numerous NPR features, film and television appearances, and an original album release, Ahanu's reach as a talented performing artist and influencer extends far beyond our city limits.

DASAN AHANU, "I Love You"

Internationally lauded (and applauded) visionary, Boris “Bluz” Rogers, is currently ranked 13th in the world for slam poetry as per the Individual World Poetry Slam competition. A distinguished, award-winning performer in his own right, Bluz has served as opener for a host of critically-acclaimed recording artists including Outkast, John Legend, and Pink Floyd – to name just a few. Highly effective in his role as coach and slam master, Bluz has led the local SlamCharlotte team to two consecutive national competition titles, putting the Queen City on the map for performance poetry.

Further, Bluz's far-reaching impact and involvement has led him to influential roles with organizations such as: Junior Achievement, Charlotte Chamber of Commerce, Blumenthal Performing Arts Center, HBOs Def Poetry, The Afro-American Cultural Center, Wachovia, Bank Of America, CBS Radio, Radio Disney, ESPN, SPEED TV, BET, and NASCAR.¹

BLUZ, "Throwback Love"

The true fluidity and slightest movement of the dancers’ gowns are fully represented in Christi Falls’ dreamy imagery. With a viewer’s slight glance in either direction, it is as if the photo is actually animated, that each layer of tulle will continue its cascade.

Appealing to the theatrical theme, Falls captures the dancers in their element with her distinctive dark, dramatic, and moody approach. Classicistic in nature, Falls’ formal group portraits could quite effectively translate to a painted medium.

Presented is a selection of distinctive bridal gowns from Paige and Elliott Bridal Boutique as designed by world renowned designers Austin Scarlett, Martina Liana, and JLM Couture of Jim Hjelm by Hayley Paige. Each piece has been chosen to meet two quite basic criteria: movement and romance.

With its converging seams and distinct trumpeted contours, every single stitch of Austin Scarlett’s “Laurel” exalts the female silhouette. The subtle sweetheart neckline and off-the-shoulder sleeves give way to a bare décolletage, inviting romance to the wedding. Though the gown is arguably classic, drama is found in the hundreds of hand-sewn buttons extending down the train – which begin at the small of her back.

Of the gown, dancer Amelia Sturt-Dilley wistfully repeats her endorsement, “I just don’t ever want to take it off!”

Jim Hjelm style #8668 is arguably the most formal gown of the entire editorial. The slight crossover neckline creates soft draping just to the natural waist. The straps are encrusted in crystals which continue across the back of the gown, meeting at its hidden zipper. This detailing makes the frock ideal for updos and is sure to dazzle guests during her walk down the aisle.

“Blake,” an intricately embroidered bodysuit also by Martina Liana, is the couture bridal world’s answer to the influx of lingerie in ready-to-wear fashion. The lace is backed with the sheerest nude tulle, creating a barely-there illusion effect.

Martina Liana’s “Shae,” made of Parisian silk, is arguably the most versatile of the over half-dozen separates represented. With the slightest movement, the skirt’s seemingly demure hemline reveals – if just for a brief second – a daringly high slit extending to the mid-thigh.

Martina Liana’s “Carter” is a modern corset top with clean lines and a deep, sweetheart neckline. The ivory satin bodice is crafted of pure silk and features figure-enhancing vertical seams.

Jim Hjelm by Hayley Paige’s whimsical tulle gown in style #8610 is incomparable to any other gown on the market. Its bodice features a myriad of hand appliqued sequins and tiny pearls in a seemingly abstract pattern that surely renders butterfly wings upon closer inspection.

The heavily beaded “Cayla” corselet by Martina Liana boasts a plunging neckline and thousands of glimmering crystal embellishments. Look closely, and a subtle floral motif is revealed.

The ever ethereal “Sawyer,” certainly feels the most ballet inspired of the entire grouping of separates. The “stone” tulle lends to a dusty, European pink and finds itself in good company with satin pointe shoes.

Presented is a selection of distinctive bridal gowns from Paige and Elliott Bridal Boutique as designed by world renowned designers Austin Scarlett, Martina Liana, and JLM Couture of Jim Hjelm by Hayley Paige. Each piece has been chosen to meet two quite basic criteria: movement and romance.

With its converging seams and distinct trumpeted contours, every single stitch of Austin Scarlett’s “Laurel” exalts the female silhouette. The subtle sweetheart neckline and off-the-shoulder sleeves give way to a bare décolletage, inviting romance to the wedding. Though the gown is arguably classic, drama is found in the hundreds of hand-sewn buttons extending down the train – which begin at the small of her back.

Of the gown, dancer Amelia Sturt-Dilley wistfully repeats her endorsement, “I just don’t ever want to take it off!”

Jim Hjelm style #8668 is arguably the most formal gown of the entire editorial. The slight crossover neckline creates soft draping just to the natural waist. The straps are encrusted in crystals which continue across the back of the gown, meeting at its hidden zipper. This detailing makes the frock ideal for updos and is sure to dazzle guests during her walk down the aisle.

“Blake,” an intricately embroidered bodysuit also by Martina Liana, is the couture bridal world’s answer to the influx of lingerie in ready-to-wear fashion. The lace is backed with the sheerest nude tulle, creating a barely-there illusion effect.

Martina Liana’s “Shae,” made of Parisian silk, is arguably the most versatile of the over half-dozen separates represented. With the slightest movement, the skirt’s seemingly demure hemline reveals – if just for a brief second – a daringly high slit extending to the mid-thigh.

Martina Liana’s “Carter” is a modern corset top with clean lines and a deep, sweetheart neckline. The ivory satin bodice is crafted of pure silk and features figure-enhancing vertical seams.

Jim Hjelm by Hayley Paige’s whimsical tulle gown in style #8610 is incomparable to any other gown on the market. Its bodice features a myriad of hand appliqued sequins and tiny pearls in a seemingly abstract pattern that surely renders butterfly wings upon closer inspection.

The heavily beaded “Cayla” corselet by Martina Liana boasts a plunging neckline and thousands of glimmering crystal embellishments. Look closely, and a subtle floral motif is revealed.

The ever ethereal “Sawyer,” certainly feels the most ballet inspired of the entire grouping of separates. The “stone” tulle lends to a dusty, European pink and finds itself in good company with satin pointe shoes.

To further set the stage, the theatre inspired tablescape is rich with texture and in color, featuring a bold, jewel-toned palette. The vintage indigo settee surely impresses with its plush velvet upholstery and intricately hand-carved wooden frame. Gilded Louis XV style armchairs add to the ambiance. These unique pieces from Carolina Charm Vintage Rentals steal the show.

Mixed metallic hues repeat in the various elements of the tablescape. At its base, the linen is an iridescent crinkled taffeta, refracting both pewter and warm rose gold hues. A pair of heavy pewter candelabras serves as a focal point and add height and dimension. The luxurious china alternates antique gold and platinum bands so as to coordinate seamlessly with the gilded stemware. Finally, the modern rose gold flatware, in not taking itself too seriously, assumes a sleek, minimalistic silhouette.

Pale, dusty blue paperie with gilded accents adds balance to a palette dominated by dark reds and deep pewters. Calligrapher Kristen Henderson stays true to the photoshoot’s ballet theme by introducing bits of silk ribbon and tulle along with modern, swooping calligraphy evocative of the most graceful movements. Always attentive to detail, Henderson is sure to include an assortment of vintage postal stamps, the most notable of which features a ballerina mid-leap. She artfully incorporates a marbled watercolor paper, every bit worthy of a hand-lettered guestbook with hand-torn pages. Finally, Henderson adds hand-crafted ribbon batons with petite bells.

Christi Falls Photography:

These bespoke engagement and wedding rings, unlike anything else in the world, are designed and handcrafted in Charlotte’s NODA neighborhood at Custom Jewelry Lab. Some pieces lend themselves more modern by incorporating innovative shapes. Others evoke Art Deco elements – perfect for our shoot’s early 20th century locale.

The lush florals by Dahlia’s boast the darkest of black dahlias, bright pops of crimson peonies, and boughs of metallic silver brunia. In the bouquets, pale pink roses add a certain femininity which keeps the look quite bridal yet still fashion forward. The greenery wields a whimsical air with its sprays of seeded eucalyptus and lacey dusty miller.

The grandiose cake by Sky’s the Limit Bridal Sweets features topmost tiers with hand-piped royal icing and intricately cut gumpaste detailing as well as a middle tier of rolled fondant ruffles. Resting on an antique pewter stand, the bottommost layer is crafted entirely of fresh-cut blooms.

Sunshower Photography:

PRODUCED BY: Charlotte Brides – Therese V. Brooks | www.charlottebrides.com | @charlottebrides
CREATED WITH: Shorthand – Rachel Bartlett, Rachael Amesbury, et al. | www.shorthand.com
DEVELOPMENT BY: Walker D. Brooks | @wdbrooks
LOCATION: The Piedmont Renaissance Center – Carol Salloum, Owner | www.prc-concord.com | @prcconcord
THE CHARLOTTE BALLET: www.charlotteballet.org | @cltballet
DANCERS: Drew Grant – @89dgrant | Josh Hall – @joshing_ | Sarah Hayes Harkins – @sarahayess | Amelia Sturt-Dilley – @ameliasd53 | Sarah Lapointe – @sarahelapointe
POETRY: Inkera Oshun – SlamCharlotte | www.slamcharlotte.com
POET: Boris Rogers (Bluz) | www.reverbnation.com/mrbluz | @bluzbluzbluz | 1www.bass-schuler.com/bluz
POET: Dasan Ahanu | www.dasanahanu.com | @dasanahanu
YOUTH DANCERS: Maya, Luisa
PHOTOGRAPHER: Christi Falls Photography – Christi Falls | www.christifalls.com | @christifalls
PHOTOGRAPHER: Richard Israel Photography – Richard Israel | www.the-israel.com | @richardisrael
PHOTOGRAPHER: Sunshower Photography – Amy Kolodziej | www.sunshowerphotography.com | @sunshowerphotography
VIDEOGRAPHER: Timm Young – Timm Young Films, Pie & Mash Filmworks, Untitled Works | www.timmyoungfilms.com | @timmyoungfilms
PLANNER: Magnificent Moments Weddings – Amanda Allsbrook | www.magnificentmomentsweddings.com | @magnificentmomentsweddings
STYLIST: Carefully Curated by EB – Brittny Ervin | www.carefullycuratedstyle.com | @carefullycuratedbyeb
BRIDAL BOUTIQUE: Paige & Elliott – Erin Padgett, Owner; Candace Prim, Manager | www.paigeandelliott.com | @paigeandelliott
BRIDAL GOWNS: Austin Scarlett – www.austinscarlett.com@austinscarlettatelier | Jim Hjelm by Hayley Paige – www.jlmcouture.com/Jim-Hjelm@jlm_couture | Martina Liana – www.essensedesigns.com/martina-liana@martinalianabridal
SHOES: Badgley Mischka
BRIDESMAID GOWNS: New York Bride & Groom – Cory Burke | www.nybride.com | @newyorkbrideandgroom
FLOWER GIRL TUTU: Dollcake – Christina Campbell | www.dollcake.com.au | @dollcakevintage
TUXEDO SUITS: New York Bride & Groom – Cory Burke | www.nybride.com | @newyorkbrideandgroom
ENGAGEMENT RINGS: Custom Jewelry Lab | www.customjewelrylab.com | @customjewelrylab
RINGBOXES: The Family Joolz – Melissa Tompkins | www.etsy.com/shop/thefamilyjoolz | @thefamilyjoolz1
EARRINGS, HEADPIECES: The Bead Lady – Kathleen Reeder | www.thebeadlady.us | @thebeadlady01
CONSULTANT, CORRESPONDENCE: Starnes & Co. Events – Maliquea Starnes | www.starnesandcoevents.com | @starnesandco
CATERER: Bistro Catering & Events – Skylar Bailes, Executive Chef; Alan Bishop, Owner | www.unionstreetbistro | @unionstreetbistro
HAIR ARTIST: Mirror Bomb Studio – Lindsay Pizzuti | www.mirrorbombstudio.com | @mirrorbomb
MAKEUP ARTIST: Cali Stott Artistry – Cali Stott | www.calistottartistry.com | @calistott_artistry
HONEY FAVORS: The Hospitable Welcome – Stefanie Morris | www.thehospitablewelcome.com | @thehospitablewelcome
PAPERIE, CALLIGRAPHER: Kristen Henderson Calligraphy – Kristen Henderson | www.kristenhendersoncalligraphy.com | @kristenhendersoncalligraphy
SILK RIBBON: Honey Silks & Co. – Jamie Lynn Hill | www.honeysilks-co.myshopify.com/collections/silk-ribbon | @honeysilksco
FLORAL DESIGN: Dahlia’s Floral Design – Allison Dahl | www.dahlias-flowers.com | @dahliasfloraldesign
CAKE: Sky’s the Limit Bridal Sweets – Ines Aranguren | www.stlbridalsweets.com | @stlcake
RENTALS: Classic Party Rentals – Kristie Smith | www.classicpartyrentals.com | @classicparty
VINTAGE FURNITURE: Carolina Charm Vintage Rentals – Christine Rowe | www.carolinacharmrentals.com | @carolinacharmrentals
VIOLINIST: Tiffany Preston | Four String Serenade | www.gigasters.com/violin/tiffanypreston